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November 29, 2005

Rogue: Page 5, Step 6

Time to talk yarn.  nona's often swayed by a yarn's "yum" factor.  Now friends, I'm using "yum" as a purely technical term -- one that precisely describes the luxurious softness and touchability of a yarn.  Throw in a little silk, alpaca, microfiber, or cashmere and chances are high it attracts me.  However, as I age -- and I'm aging -- I've come to appreciate other, less glamorous aspects of yarn.  There are even times when I want to knit with 100%, rough and ready, slightly scratchy, must wear a shirt underneath, spongy, springy, wonderful wool.  Rogue happens to be one of these times.


It may not be "Yum", but it's the right yarn for the Rogue.

In Rogue I see a sweater begging to be knit in good old fashion wool.  I want Rogue's cables to be pronounced and sculpted and I want Rogue to be a winter, outdoor sweater.  For these reasons and more, I selected Jamieson's Shetland Heather in Pippin and I'm loving it!  You'll never pick up a ball of Shetland Heather, cradle it under your chin, and whisper "Yum".  But -- and here's the kicker -- there's more to life -- and knitting -- then yum.   

November 29, 2005 in Project - Rogue | Permalink | Comments (8)

November 28, 2005

Peaceful Palms Weekly #5

We have a lot of busy glove knitters out there!  First, congratulations to this week's Peaceful Palms finishers:

  • Agnes finished a fabulous pair of lace gloves from A Gathering of Lace.  Agnes recommends that if you like knitting socks you'll also enjoy knitting gloves -- I totally agree!
  • Bernadette is definitely hooked on gloves finishing her second pair of Hooray for Me Gloves -- this pair for her son.
  • Betty finished a great pair of tipless gloves for her son.  She enjoyed the entire glove knitting process -- up to the weaving of ends, that is!
  • Carola finished her pair of "Glottons" using Noro Kureyon.  She cleverly added crocheted "little bridges" between the fingers of these fingerless gloves -- be sure to go look for yourself!
  • Ceris knit a beautiful pair of gloves from Louisa Harding's Gathering Roses Accessories Collection.
  • Dena is very happy with her i-cord gloves -- loving the yarn and the finished gloves.
  • Ina is well into her Holiday Knitting completing a pair of fingerless gloves of her own design.  These will make a great holiday gift for the lucky recipient!
  • Judy is also a multi glove finisher.  She finished her 2nd pair of fingerless gloves -- using a toothpick to knit the thumb -- and is well into her 3rd pair.
  • Kim (scroll down to Nov 17th) finished a pair of gloves for her boyfriend using one strand of alpaca for warmth and one strand of Sock It to Me wool/nylon for strength.
  • Margene finished her Grrlfriend Gloves and found they went great with her newly completed Brier jacket -- check out her complete hand knit ensemble here.
  • Mary finished a pair of fingerless gloves -- she plans to wear them when cycling to work.
  • Mia's beautiful, lacy gloves were finished just in time for the first snow.
  • Renata finished her Broad Street Mittens, modifying the pattern to include an intarsia star on the mitten cover. 
  • Tara, a new knit alonger, has already finished one pair of gloves for her father-in-law and plans to make a 2nd pair for her mom.

While lot's of you are hard at work and almost finished:

  • Alice is almost finished with your tipless gloves, having only the ends to weave in.  She cleverly used short rows to subtly shape the back of the hand.
  • Carina (scroll down) has finished her first Garn Studio fingerless glove -- it looks very soft and cozy -- and is well into its mate.
  • Elaine plans to knit Sweaterscape's Opera Gloves -- long and elegant.
  • Faith has finished the fingers of her first Urban Necessity glove.
  • Heather O. is knitting a pair of top down gloves.  After knitting several i-cord fingers, she switched to using i-cord until the increases were done and knitting the rest in the round.
  • Kelly is converting a pair of partially knit socks into her second pair of Peaceful Palms gloves.
  • Laura is primed and ready -- books and magazines collected, yarn purchased, fingers measured -- to knit a pair of gloves for her boyfriend.
  • Sherry is knitting Lucy Neatby's Paradoxical Mitten -- quite cool.
  • Springy is almost finished with her tipless gloves, only 2 more fingers to go.  Go on over and cheer her on to the finish line.
  • Winnie has started a pair of fingerless gloves for her husband.

On a final note, let's quickly flash back to the Nothing But a T-Shirt knit along.  I'd like to congratulate several recent finishers:

  • Carry finished her NBaT and it looks great -- worth all the hard work!
  • Nancy debuted her finished NBaT on Thanksgiving -- lucky girl lives in a nice warm climate!  Go find out what happened when they went back into the house after the NBaT photo shoot...

November 28, 2005 in Knit Along - Peaceful Palms | Permalink | Comments (6)

November 27, 2005

Thanksgiving Whirlwind

The week long -- yes, week long -- whirlwind of food, family, guests, dishes, fun, birthday celebrating, knitting, eating, visiting, hostessing, and chit-chatting, which we -- the extended nona-family -- call Thanksgiving has come to a close.  My Internet world was "paused" as my laptop remained dormant for well over a week and I disconnected from my blogging, email world to connect with my family -- several of whom I see only twice a year.  Needless to say, Thanksgiving is nona's favorite holiday.

This year, my Thanksgiving celebration was prefaced by a wonderful knitting retreat in Olema featuring Beth Brown-Reinsel's North Halland Red and Back Pullover Workshop.  In the process of knitting a miniature sweater we learned a bit of history and many, many useful and fascinating techniques.  The highlights for me were learning to knit with 2 colors in the same hand and finally understanding what yarn dominance is all about.  Beth is a knowledgeable teacher and a lovely person. 


November 27, 2005 | Permalink | Comments (5)

November 16, 2005

Knitting Retreat

Speaking of inpulsive behavior, last March my friend and I impulsively signed up for the Olema Knitting Retreat.  We had no clue who was teaching or even where exactly Olema was, but someone recommended it and we signed up.  Well here it is November and we're off to the retreat.  Beth Brown-Reinsel is teaching the 2 day workshop and we're staying and eating at The Olema Inn.  I've heard both are fabulous.   I'll see you all when I get back!

November 16, 2005 in Where nonaKnits | Permalink | Comments (14)

November 15, 2005

Impulsive Behavior

Although some tend to avoid impulsive behavior, I embrace it.  Isn't impulsive behavior simply a symptom of living in the moment?  Perhaps I'm delusional, but let's go with that.  As you may have realized, perceptive reader, nona's been impulsive recently.  Last Saturday, I felt the need to leaf through my back issues of Interweave Knits.  When I reached Summer 2004, page 74 -- bam -- I stopped mid page turn.  What a fabulous Fair Isle Bag!  Hey look who designed it, Beth Brown-Reinsel!  I'm taking a knitting workshop from her soon.  At this point, impulsive behavior took over.  I finished my Saturday chores -- can you say carrot -- and headed out to my LYS to visit and to buy.  By the end of the day I was happily stranding along.

Have you experienced any impulsive knitting recently?

November 15, 2005 in Project - This and That | Permalink | Comments (13)

November 14, 2005

Peaceful Palms Weekly #4

What fun it's been following everyone's Peaceful Palms progress.  To date, the most popular glove patterns seem to be Hooray For Me Gloves and Broad Street Mittens.  Several of you have been adventurous and are knitting cabled or lace gloves, while others are designing their own gloves.  For many of us, these are our first pair of gloves and we're learning a lot.  What Peaceful Palms news do you have?

Congratulations to this week's Peaceful Palms finishers:

  • Bekki finished her Broad Street mittens and has artfully hidden them behind a delicious looking pumpkin pie!
  • Gale finished her Laced Up Fingerless Gloves from AlterKnits and confesses that she may have knit them just so she could buy some beautiful ribbon for the laces!  Be sure to check out her nature inspired photos.
  • Janina finished her Natalya gauntlets and has enjoyed wearing them.  She learned several new things while knitting these gloves including, "how to drop down stitches to fix a mistake rather than ripping back, a very valuable thing to know indeed."
  • Janine knit a beautiful pair of lace gloves from A Gathering of Lace and plans to knit a matching scarf.  I admire Janine for tackling lace gloves for her first pair of gloves.  Over the weekend, she also finished a pair of Broad Street Mittens -- aka Riggng Gloves -- for her husband.
  • Joy knit the Eowyn wrist warmers from Rowan 38, which turned out really well!
  • Kristin finished her pair of Mac & Me fingerless gloves.  The yarn she used looks so soft and subtle that the gloves are screaming "wear me, wear me"!
  • Melissa F. also finished a pair of Lace Up Fingerless Gloves from Alterknits.  This was Melissa's first pair of gloves and they turned out really well!
  • Teresa knit a fun pair of Hooray For Me Gloves in self striping yarn. 

Other knit along action includes:

  • Agnes has started her Vanalinn Gloves from A Gathering of Lace.  She's also recently finished the most amazing sweater!
  • Becky is making the Cigar Gloves for her husband.  Since this is her first foray into glove knitting, she's knitting a test glove to get the kinks out -- in our house we call this "the tester pancake".
  • Carola is knitting a tipless variation on the i-cord gloves -- very creative!
  • Dena connected the i-cord fingers of her gloves, only to discover the fingers were too long.  She plans to rip back and shorten the fingers.
  • Julia is knitting the most stunning pair of fair isle gloves.  She's also put together a photo album with her progress pictures -- check it out.
  • Kathy's palm is looking more peaceful already in her partial Hooray For Me Glove.
  • Kim is experiencing a bit of 2nd glove/sock syndrome, having finished one of each.
  • Lynn F. has caught the finger fever and has been having fun experimenting with the i-cord fingers.
  • Lynn P.  finished her first fingerless glove using the Potluck Wool Mittenettes pattern.  She knit the glove on 2 circular needles using fishermans wool she dyed with Koolaid.
  • Margene is 2 fingers shy of finishing her Grrlfriend Gloves.
  • Renata finished her first Broad Street mitten.  She's updated the pattern by adding a star.  You can find her star chart here.

November 14, 2005 in Knit Along - Peaceful Palms | Permalink | Comments (5)

November 13, 2005

I-Cord Gloves - 3rd Installment

In the 3rd installment of my I-Cord Glove pattern, we'll connect the thumb to the glove and shape the thumb gusset.  "Gusset" is one of my favorite words -- I like trying to use it in casual conversation -- and was pleased to see that gloves, like socks, have a gusset.

I-Cord Gloves: Serial Pattern: Installment 3


Previous installments of the I-Cord Glove pattern include:

  • Installment 1 -- In which we kick started the gloves and knit the 10 fingers using Meg Swansen's I-Cord finger technique.
  • Installment 2 -- In which we joined the 4 fingers together and worked the body of the glove down to the thumb.

As you work this pattern, please email me if you spot an error, have a problem, or would like to suggest a change.  Your feedback will help make this a better pattern for others -- Thanks!

As with installment 2, these directions assume you're knitting in the round using 2 circular needles -- needle #1 and needle #2 -- if you're more comfortable with double pointed needles simply adapt the directions accordingly. 

We'll join the thumb to the glove using the same join technique we used to join the fingers.  The thumb is not placed at the side of the hand, instead it is offset slightly toward the palm.  At this point in the pattern, we need to distinguish the right glove from the left glove -- and will knit the right glove first.

Right Glove

Joining the Thumb to the Right Glove
The first step is to redistribute the stitches, moving 3 of the palm stitches to the top of the hand .  For the right glove, the palm stitches are on needle #1 and the top of the hand stitches are on needle #2.

  • Move the last 3 stitches at the end of needle #1 onto the beginning of needle #2.  Needle #1 should have 21 (22, 25) stitches and needle #2 should have 28 (29, 31) stitches.

Now join the thumb as follows:

  • Round 1
    • Needle #1:  Slip 8 (8, 9) thumb stitches onto the end of the left needle -- these thumb stitches should be the last stitches you knit as follows:  k20 (21, 24), place a marker, k2tog, k7 (7, 8) ==> 28 (29, 33) stitches
    • Needle #2:  Slip the remaining 8 (8, 9) thumb stitches onto the beginning of the right needle -- these thumb stitches should be the first stitches you knit as follows:  k7 (7, 8), k2tog, place a marker, knit to the end ==> 35 (36, 39) stitches.
  • Round 2
    • Needle #1:  Knit to the marker, slip marker, slip the next stitch onto a safety pin -- always hold the pin behind the needle and bring the yarn under the pin as you continue -- knit to end.
    • Needle #2:  Knit 7 (7, 8), slip the stitch from the safety pin onto the left needle and knit it, slip the next stitch onto a safety pin, slip marker, knit to end.
  • Round 3
    • Needle #1:  Knit to the marker, slip marker, slip the stitch from the safety pin onto the left needle and knit it, knit to end.
    • Needle #2:  Knit all stitches.

Shaping the Right Glove's Thumb Gusset
There should be 16 (16, 18) stitches between the 2 markers.  These 16 (16, 18) stitches form the thumb gusset and will be decreased complete away over several decrease rounds, with each decrease round decreasing 2 stitches.  Here goes:

  • Round 4
    • Needle #1:  Knit to marker, slip marker, ssk, knit to end
    • Needle #2:  Knit to 2 stitches before the marker, k2tog, slip marker, knit to end
  • Round 5 & 6
    • Needle #1:  Knit all stitches
    • Needle #2:  Knit all stitches

Repeat these last 3 rounds until these are only 2 stitches between the markers.

  • Next Round
    • Needle #1:  Knit to 1 stitch before marker, ssk removing marker ==> 20 (21, 24) stitches
    • Needle #2:  k2tog removing marker, knit to end ==> 27 (28, 30) stitches
  • Next Round
    • Knit all stitches
  • Next Round
    • Decrease 3 (1, 2) stitches evenly distributed across the round ==> 44 (48, 52) total stitches


Right glove with thumb attached and gusset shaped!

Left Glove
The left glove is worked as a mirror image of the right.

Joining the Thumb to the Left Glove
The first step is to redistribute the stitches, moving 3 of the palm stitches to the top of the hand . For the left glove, the palm stitches are on needle #2 and the top of the hand stitches are on needle #1.

  • Move the first 3 stitches from the beginning of needle #2 onto the end of needle #1.  Needle #1 should have 28 (29, 31) stitches and needle #2 should have 21 (22, 25) stitches.

Now join the thumb as follows:

  • Round 1
    • Needle #1:  Slip 8 (8, 9) thumb stitches onto the end of the left needle -- these thumb stitches should be the last stitches you knit as follows:  k27 (28, 30), place a marker, k2tog, k7 (7, 8) ==> 35 (36, 39) stitches
    • Needle #2:  Slip the remaining 8 (8, 9) thumb stitches onto the beginning of the right needle -- these thumb stitches should be the first stitches you knit as follows:  k7 (7, 8), k2tog, place a marker, knit to the end ==> 28 (29, 33) stitches.
  • Round 2
    • Needle #1:  Knit to the marker, slip marker, slip the next stitch onto a safety pin -- always hold the pin behind the needle and bring the yarn under the pin as you continue -- knit to end.
    • Needle #2:  Knit 7 (7, 8), slip the stitch from the safety pin onto the left needle and knit it, slip the next stitch onto a safety pin, slip marker, knit to end.
  • Round 3
    • Needle #1:  Knit to the marker, slip marker, slip the stitch from the safety pin onto the left needle and knit it, knit to end.
    • Needle #2:  Knit all stitches.

Shaping the Left Glove's Thumb Gusset
There should be 16 (16, 18) stitches between the 2 markers.  These 16 (16, 18) stitches form the thumb gusset and will be decreased complete away over several decrease rounds, with each decrease round decreasing 2 stitches.  Here goes:

  • Round 4
    • Needle #1:  Knit to marker, slip marker, ssk, knit to end
    • Needle #2:  Knit to 2 stitches before the marker, k2tog, slip marker, knit to end
  • Round 5 & 6
    • Needle #1:  Knit all stitches
    • Needle #2:  Knit all stitches

Repeat these last 3 rounds until these are only 2 stitches between the markers.

  • Next Round
    • Needle #1:  Knit to 1 stitch before marker, ssk removing marker ==> 27 (28, 30) stitches
    • Needle #2:  k2tog removing marker, knit to end ==> 20 (21, 24) stitches
  • Next Round
    • Knit all stitches
  • Next Round
    • Decrease 3 (1, 2) stitches evenly distributed across the round ==> 44 (48, 52) total stitches

What's Next
In the next and final installment, we'll knit the glove's cuff.  But heck, don't feel like you have to wait for me -- pick a ribbing your like and perhaps add an embellishment or two.  Until next time, happy glove knitting!

November 13, 2005 in Serial Patterns | Permalink | Comments (17)

November 11, 2005

Rogue: Page 5, Step 4

Recently, nona's world has revolved around spiral madness, finger fever, and baby bobbles.  This evening -- with the work week behind me and take out food on the table -- the "back to basics" knitting Siren softly cooed, "sweater, wool, cables."  Thinking it prudent, I listened to the imaginary voice and succumbed to the pleasures of knitting Rogue.  For my fellow Rogue knitters, I'm one page 5, step 4, chart A, row 61 -- need I say more?

I rarely follow a pattern as written, always adding this and changing that.  Not so for Rogue.  I'm minding my Ps and Qs, following the pattern step by step, and enjoying the ingenious details along the way.  Case in point, as the side cable twists and turns, in and out, it quietly doubles as the sweater's waist shaping.  In nona's book, the girl from auntie is one clever girl and I'm going to listen and learn!

November 11, 2005 in Project - Rogue | Permalink | Comments (5)

November 10, 2005

Spiral Scarf

nona had to stop the madness, the Spiral Madness.  With great sorrow I bound off my spiral scarf. Although I wasn't done knitting the scarf -- it was so dang fun -- the scarf had grown long enough, the scarf was finished.   The question, fashionable reader, is now -- "What's the best way to wear the spiral?"


Long and Loose  OR >>

I'm partial to "Doubled Over and Through", which do you prefer?  Interested in knitting a Spiral Scarf for yourself?  Continue reading...

Spiral Scarf

The spiral scarf is formed from a series of pie shaped wedges knit one after the other, spiraling around and around.  Each wedge is created using short rows* -- please, please don't be afraid of the short row, once you get the hang of them you'll be buzzing right along.  More information on the YO short row technique used in this pattern can be found here.  The 3 edge stitches on the outside of each wedge forms a slip stitch edging.**

Finished Size
Approximately 3 inches by 62 inches -- hanging

Materials

  • Yarn -- Approximately 350 yards of medium to light weight yarn -- I used RY's Cashsoft 510 Clementine (3 balls)
  • Needles -- Appropriate needle for chosen yarn -- I used US 6.

Gauge
Approximately 18 - 22 sts in 4 inches.  Matching the exact gauge is not critical.

Abbreviations and Techniques

sl1 -- Slip 1 Stitch -- Slip one stitch from the left needle to the right needle.  When slipping the stitch, insert the right needle into the loop as if to purl.
yf -- Yarn Front -- Move the yarn to the front, taking it  between the needles.
yb -- Yarn Back -- Move the yarn to the back, taking it between the needles.
bYO -- Backward Yarn Over -- take the yarn to the back between the needles and then over the right needle to bring the yarn to the front.
Correct Mount -- The next stitch on the left needle is "backwards", the left leg of the loop is in front of the needle instead of the right leg.  Use the right needle to turn this stitch around, leaving it on the left needle.
k2tog -- knit 2 stitches together.
WS -- Wrong Side
RS -- Right Side

Directions

  • Cast on 13 stitches
  • Starting with a Wrong Side (WS) row, knit the first wedge as follows:
Row 1 (WS): purl 10 sts, sl1, p1, sl1
Row 2 (RS): k1, yf, sl1, yb, k9, turn
Row 3 and all remaining WS rows: bYO, purl to last 3 sts, sl1, p1, sl1 
Note:  The bYO at the beginning of the row creates a YO just before the 1st purl stitch.  The YO will look slightly "different", this is correct.
Row 4: k1, yf, sl1, yb, k8, turn
Row 6: k1, yf, sl1, yb, k7, turn
Row 8: k1, yf, sl1, yb, k6, turn
Row 10: k1, yf, sl1, yb, k5, turn
Are you seeing the trend here?
Row 12: k1, yf, sl1, yb, k4, turn
Row 14: k1, yf, sl1, yb, k3, turn
Row 16: k1, yf, sl1, yb, k2, turn
Row 18: k1, yf, sl1, yb, k2, [correct mount, k2tog] 8 times, k1
  • Repeat these 18 rows until scarf is approximately 62 inches or desired length.

References and Inspirations
* Other variations on the theme of short row spiral scarfs include Amanda Blair Brown's Ruffles published in "Scarf Style" and Teva Durham's Spiral scarf published in "Loop D Loop".
** I learned the 3 stitch slip stitch edging from Annie Modesitt's Backyard Leaves scarf published in "Scarf Style".

November 10, 2005 in Project - This and That | Permalink | Comments (27)

November 08, 2005

Timely Finish

24 hours ago I thought to myself, "Hey nona, what about that baby hat you have to finish by Wednesday?"  Yikes, had the weekend really slipped by without any -- zilch -- baby hat knitting.  Perhaps I'd been a bit too preoccupied with fingers and gloves!  No worries, I had the pattern and I had the yarn and -- poof -- I have the hat, finished and ready to go.

What a fun, satisfying project.  There was a little bit of everything -- picot cast on, increasing, decreasing, bobbles, and last but not least, ear flaps.  The ear flaps are very cleverly designed.   


When in use, the tie is threaded through a small button hole in the ear flap.


If the ear flaps are not needed, they are buttoned up into the inside of the hat.  Pretty nifty!

November 8, 2005 in Project - This and That | Permalink | Comments (13)

All patterns, designs, content, and photographs Copyright 2004-2010 nonaKnits and Carolyn Quill Steele. All rights reserved. If you have any copyright questions or request, please ask -- nonaKnits at gmail dot com.